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About Serres

Serres is a small traditional French farming village of about 50 people, surrounded by vineyards and situated at the foot of Pech Cardou to the south, on the northern edge of the Pyrenees. The village is at an altitude of 270m and the peak dominates it at 800m.

Travelling here from the UK is quite simple. EasyJet and BA fly into Toulouse (90 mins by car airport to door) from Heathrow and Gatwick and regional airports, and RyanAir fly into Carcassonne from Stansted (40 mins airport to door). Perpignan and Beziers are other options with longer drives. Driving down from the Channel Ports takes between 10 – 14 hours depending on how you like to drive. 

There are no shops in the village, these are located in Couiza about 7km west. However, between March and November, we have a café culturel called “La Claranda” opposite the village park. It opens at weekends and has a full entertainment programme – see the “Events” tab for up-to-date details. 

Set above and to the north of the village is the 16th century chateau, and the Place de la Mairie has the Église de Saint Pierre and a central olive tree set on the La Méridienne Verte. The restored 17th century stone bridge also has a MV marker and is a much-viewed attraction on the Route du Pays Cathare, as is the Château d'Arques 5km to the east and the ruined Château de Coustaussa 4km to the west.

The historic spa town of Rennes-les-Bains is 4km to the south and provides modern relaxation facilities, and the notorious village of Rennes-le-Château, made famous by conspiracy theories involving Mary Magdalene, Bérenger Saunière and culminating in Dan Brown's bestselling novel “The Da Vinci Code”, is 10km to the south-west. 

The local vignerons who live next door, Nicolas and Amandine Therez, produce some excellent examples of the regional AOC wines, Blanquette and Crémant de Limoux. Locals argue that as the first recorded mention of it in the cellars of the Benedictine abbey of Saint-Hilaire dates back to 1531, long before the Benedictine monk Dom Perignon was born, this sparkling wine was a precursor to champagne.

The D613 runs from Narbonne in the east to Ax-les-Thermes in the west and passes the southern edge of the village. It is an amazing road for driving, either by car, by motorbike, or for cyclists.

Learn More

About Serres

Serres is a small traditional French farming village of about 50 people, surrounded by vineyards and situated at the foot of Pech Cardou to the south, on the northern edge of the Pyrenees. The village is at an altitude of 270m and the peak dominates it at 800m.

Travelling here from the UK is quite simple. EasyJet and BA fly into Toulouse (90 mins by car airport to door) from Heathrow and Gatwick and regional airports, and RyanAir fly into Carcassonne from Stansted (40 mins airport to door). Perpignan and Beziers are other options with longer drives. Driving down from the Channel Ports takes between 10 – 14 hours depending on how you like to drive. 

There are no shops in the village, these are located in Couiza about 7km west. However, between March and November, we have a café culturel called “La Claranda” opposite the village park. It opens at weekends and has a full entertainment programme – see the “Events” tab for up-to-date details. 

Set above and to the north of the village is the 16th century chateau, and the Place de la Mairie has the Église de Saint Pierre and a central olive tree set on the La Méridienne Verte. The restored 17th century stone bridge also has a MV marker and is a much-viewed attraction on the Route du Pays Cathare, as is the Château d'Arques 5km to the east and the ruined Château de Coustaussa 4km to the west.

The historic spa town of Rennes-les-Bains is 4km to the south and provides modern relaxation facilities, and the notorious village of Rennes-le-Château, made famous by conspiracy theories involving Mary Magdalene, Bérenger Saunière and culminating in Dan Brown's bestselling novel “The Da Vinci Code”, is 10km to the south-west. 

The local vignerons who live next door, Nicolas and Amandine Therez, produce some excellent examples of the regional AOC wines, Blanquette and Crémant de Limoux. Locals argue that as the first recorded mention of it in the cellars of the Benedictine abbey of Saint-Hilaire dates back to 1531, long before the Benedictine monk Dom Perignon was born, this sparkling wine was a precursor to champagne.

The D613 runs from Narbonne in the east to Ax-les-Thermes in the west and passes the southern edge of the village. It is an amazing road for driving, either by car, by motorbike, or for cyclists.

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L’Ancienne Cave

Our house (the old cellar) dates back many centuries (there is a keystone set above the kitchen window with 1675 carved into it) but has been completely modernised by the previous owner since 2000, so it up to date with modern plumbing and electricity supplies. It used to be two separate buildings but these have now been seamlessly incorporated into one. The ground floor has a nice “snug” accessed from the street, and immediately adjacent to this, with the large cellar arch onto the Place de la Mairie, is the living room. One goes through the snug into the kitchen and dining room. The dining room has direct access to two courtyards through sets of double glass doors and a feature of both the living and dining rooms is the wall between them, nearly a metre thick and into which is set a log-burner with glass doors onto both rooms. On the first floor there are three rooms, each with a full shower suite, for guests: Le Château, La Maison and Le Chalet. These are described on the “Availability and Rooms” page. The owners have their accommodation on the second floor and a private terrace in the west courtyard.

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Your Hosts

L'Ancienne Cave is owned and run by Amanda (mostly) and Kevin.

Amanda is a former corporate wage slave now aiming to provide the sort of break she was always searching for to ease the pain. She has experience as a pub manager and in corporate hospitality. She is a huge fan of good, well sourced food and a keen cook.

Kevin is aiming to shortly retire disgracefully from what seems a lifetime in technological change and trying to keep commercial broadcast television making efficiencies, and plans to get under Amanda's feet in a helpful way. Oh, and grow fat(ter) on the great meals that Amanda turns out daily.